Book Review: ‘The Wild Girl’ by Kate Forsyth

wild girl cover

Book Title: The Wild Girl

Author: Kate Forsyth

Genre: Historical Fiction

Summary: Believed to be the source of many stories made famous by the Grimm brothers, this is the story of Dortchen Wild, the woman behind the fairy tales. Set against the backdrop of Napolean Bonaparte’s attempt to conquer Europe, this is a story of stories that follows the love between Dortchen and Wilhem Grimm – and Dortchen’s own story of resilience and hope.

Favourite Scene: I know I say it all the time, but I have so many favourite scenes to choose from in this book – the opening scene is particularly beautiful.

Favourite Character: Dortchen. I try not to choose main characters as ‘favourites’, but I cannot get past this incredible woman.

Review: Stunning. I knew that I was in for a treat after reading Bitter Greens but this book was just … stunning. It took me a little while to pick it up from my table because I was nervous – I had high expectations and I was worried it wouldn’t meet them or, worse, it would exceed my expectations and come to an end all too quickly. It was one part the latter and all other parts breathtaking, so while I caught my breath I stayed in the world of The Wild Girl for just a little bit longer …

It’s not all beautiful and wonderful – in fact, sometimes my stomach churned and I felt physically ill because of some of the things that happened to Dortchen.What is incredible is Dortchen’s spirit – wild in every beautiful sense of the word. Every character earnt their page-time and every detail contributed to a magical tale. Ultimately Dortchen is empowered, presenting a strong and resilient character with a ‘wildness’ that all young women should be encouraged to have: independence, compassion, determination.

I am rapidly becoming a huge fan of historical fiction – and this book sets a new benchmark in telling “untold” stories from history. Forsyth’s depth of research is commendable – it was a brilliant factor in Bitter Greens but she reaches a new level in The Wild Girl in terms of painting accurate (and deeply fascinating) pictures of the past. The result is a plausible (and enchanting) story for Dortchen and her relationship with Wilhelm. I loved the intricate detail of all of the characters, and the magical way Forsyth wove history into her narrative.

I was thoroughly lost in the narrative well into the early hours of the morning, and finding my way back was part of the enchantment.

5 commas!

 

5 commas

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